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All the latest news for European Business Summit 2014 - speakers, partners and new features for the next summit, including the EBS Launch Event

A federal judge has rejected an effort by American Airlines to quickly cut off benefits for many of its retirees. American, which is in bankruptcy, wants retirees who wish to keep their benefits to pay all the cost.

The ownership ties between a Utah bank and a Ghanaian company raise questions about the role of sanctions.

Monte dei Paschi di Siena is fighting to avoid nationalization and bracing for stress tests of its balance sheet by European regulators.

The bug that rattled the Internet last week exposed the paradox that some of the web’s most crucial coding depends on the efforts of volunteers.

The rise in shares in both Weibo, a Chinese microblogging service, and Sabre, a technology services provider, came after they scaled back the sizes of their offerings.

Paul J. Taubman has single-handedly accounted for $175 billion in deals over the last year, which has had Wall Street bankers buzzing with a mix of admiration and envy.

Some chief executives like to sugarcoat bad results, but the interim chief executive of the Co-operative Group felt no such need when reporting the firm’s results.

An investigation by New York authorities is part of a broad national crackdown on businesses seeking to turn a quick profit by exporting luxury cars from the United States to China.

Of all the major industrialized countries, only Germany and Japan have managed to return to their 2007 employment levels.

Laboratoires Servier, the pharmaceutical company founded by Mr. Servier, was hailed as a champion of French business until its diabetes drug was withdrawn from the market.

The company’s global problems add to the bumps the company face in the United States, including opposition from taxi groups and driver complaints.

Companies across the globe have long tried to attract viewers to live Internet broadcasts, with X-rated sites the only real success stories. China appears to have cracked the code.

On April 15, as individual taxpayers file, taking a look at a few opportunities for corporations that they may find slightly irksome.

The presence of a United States-flagged aircraft in Iran is highly unusual these days, especially when it’s owned by a small Utah bank.

The suit, filed by several big record companies on Thursday, accuses Pandora of violating common-law copyright protections for songs made before 1972.

Rapid industrialization, agricultural mismanagement and metals production are all contributing to contamination that is raising alarms about food and physical health.

Under an agreement with a French regulator, the company will to make it easier for rivals to produce single-serving capsules for Nespresso machines.

“No point being all British and coy about it,” said the pensions minister, Steve Webb, who said an idea of life expectancy can aid financial planning.

To gain traction, many European tech founders often focus on their individual home markets, but that strategy is starting to change.

Michael Weatherly, a member of Parliament and adviser to Prime Minister David Cameron, says copyright owners will look to efforts beyond legislation.

Jason N. Ader, the chief investment officer of SpringOwl, is using a proxy battle to bring change to Bwin.Party, the British online gambling company.

The appointment comes as True[X], a venture capital-backed start-up, refreshes its board, bringing in industry expertise as it grows.

In a statement posted on its website, the Tokyo-based company said a local court had dismissed its request that it be allowed to try to rehabilitate its business.

Asian share markets inched higher on Thursday as dovish comments from the head of the U.S. Federal Reserve lifted Wall Street with while trade was light heading into the Easter holidays.

The bank posted a loss equivalent to $3.04 billion for its roller-coaster 2013.